ACGS Spring Conference

Tomorrow Sue and I will be headed off to the American-Canadian Genealogical Society’s annual Spring Conference in Manchester, NH.  I have copied the event announcement from their website below.

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The start of Sue's application to join
La Société des Filles du roi.

For those of you keeping track, Sue has ancestors from New France and a Connection to the Filles du roi – The Kings Daughter’s.  My Canadian ancestry however is from Nova Scotia by way of England and Scotland.

We will be sure to report back on our trip and keep an eye on our Facebook page because you never know what trouble we may find and if you are attending… be sure to look for us and say hello!

American-Canadian Genealogical Society Annual Spring Conference

April 23, 2016
8:00AM-4PM

8:00-9:00 AM Registration – FREE Bring a friend!
Coffee, pastries, and fruit will be available during the registration period.
50-50 Raffle

Class schedule:

9:00-10:20 AM
Jeffrey Barraclough -Manchester Historic Association
Resources available at MHA Research Center for genealogical research, including
Manchester City Directories, the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company’s employee
records, and the Manchester School registers collection.
Eileen Reddy – Manchester City Library – Special Collection NH Room
An overview of the NH Room at Manchester City Library and its resources for genealogical
research including newspapers, Vital Records, and census information.

10:30-11:50 AM
Brian Burford – New Hampshire Archive
Deborah Moore – New Hampshire Vital Records

Genealogical information available in the state of New Hampshire.

12:00-1:00 PM      Lunch
For your convenience, we are offering a bagged lunch for $10. You may still bring your own
or go out if you wish. Download the Order Form for the Box Lunch here.

1:00-2:00 PM    Lineage Societies for French-Canadians
Janine Penfield – ACGS
Lineage Societies for French-Canadians
Our North American ancestors did not enjoy the same boundaries we know today, and when French-
Canadians found themselves in positions to choose sides they did. Mayflower Descendants and other
Colonial societies aren’t the only ones to enjoy Founding Fathers and Mothers to celebrate. North
American history provides a complex cast of characters in our trees. Learn how American history can
help you find a lineage society – confirmation in proving your line and finding distant cousins.
Daughters of the American Revolution, La Société des Filles du roi, and Piscataqua Pioneers will be
presented.

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Editing Away on Episode 3

Just a quick follow up tonight.  A while back I had the pleasure of interviewing four wonderful people involved with Nashua’s Family History Center.  We had scheduled to do this in the studio and with about 5 minutes prior to them arriving, we lost power throughout the area due to an accident.  Not letting that get us down, we quickly packed a location kit and drove across town to the Family History Center itself to shoot what I am sure, is a much stronger piece than had we done it at the station.  Everything for a reason.

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Well life got in the way but tonight I was able to make significant headway on the project and soon I will be happy to announce that this episode will be ready.

In the meantime, be sure to check out the Nashua Family History Center on their Facebook page [Link] or their page on the Family Search Wiki [Link]

Brick Walls – aka ‘The Dead End’

With another busy work project behind me, I had the pleasure of getting out in the world and attending two genealogy talks this week.  One was on DNA and will be the topic of a future post as I need to let the information settle in.

The other talk was “Strategies For Tackling Your Genealogy Brickwall” by Jake Fletcher of the popular blog – Travelogues of a Genealogist (link).  The talk was a part of the Chelmsford (MA) Genealogy Club.

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Over the hour, Jake discussed his go to methods for trying to break down a brick wall including reviewing your documentation with a fresh set of eyes after a while to Researching their occupation, to knowing the geography of a region as county lines often changed.

Another area to look at; Cluster and FAN research – Family/Friends, Associates and Neighbors.  Look at those around your ancestor, their neighbors in city directories, witnesses to records such as land deeds and probate items.  Jake even suggested documenting the names of neighbors five pages before and after their name on a census record to get a better understanding of people they may know and bump into.  Perhaps the close friend who was witness to a marriage had the favor returned by the ancestor you are looking for which could open up a new hint to move on.

He also suggested the use of a research log or journal. As you do your searching, list what you search for, where you search for it, what keywords you may have used and what you found.  You may have found nothing for that matter, and you should list that as well.  Sometimes nothing is the same as finding something – but that is a topic for  a different day.

His Log includes columns for Date, Repository / Website, Title of Collection, Keyword Search, and Results.   I have tried this in the past and I will tell you it is hard to do.  When you do the searches, you need to break from the results and record what you have, and if your anything like me you want to just keep on clicking to see what that record looks like.  I use spreadsheets on  google drive for this purpose but I do think, I want to switch to a paper one to log notes and then transcribe it at a later time.

I also think that the term brick wall can be scary.  Walls keep people from passing.  It is that simple.  Don’t ever give up though.  Genealogy can be like a maze – there is bound to be a way to get through it and some may harder than others, and who knows what the next left turn will bring.

My Hungarian ancestry for instance.  The records have always been there at the Family History Center on microfilm but they were just that far out of reach at the time.  Now, with several of them online and better access to the Family History Center [and more knowledge of]  I am able to travel down that path as far as it will take me.I am fortunate that I don’t (yet) have anything I would consider a brick wall.  While I do have several unfinished ends, I don’t feel that I have researched any of them well enough to place them into that category.  Perhaps though that is what makes it a brick wall in the first place?  Something that gets in the way of your research to make you move on to something seemingly ‘simpler’.

For now though, I will continue to consider my Brick Walls to be nothing more than a bump in the road – some which may be nothing more than a spring pothole.

The Chelmsford Genealogy club meets the first Tuesday of the month at the Chelmsford Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford MA.  Their Next meeting will feature Rhonda R McLure speaking on New England Research. (Link)(Facebook)

The Search for the Grave of Moses Noble

On Friday I had the honor of presenting to the Hudson, NH Genealogy Club, our search for the Grave of Moses Noble of Berwick, Maine.  This talk covered how Sue and I went about our search, using Google Earth and Google Maps, the advantages to speaking with local residents, and some ideas to help record information when you do find something, even if it is not what you were looking for.

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Once I finish editing the interview with the Family History Center, I will record this talk in front of the camera to make the next episode.

Some of the links mentioned in the talk (in no particular order) include:

I was also going to upload the power point presentation as a whole but without context I am not sure it will hold up on its own.  Best wait for the episode!

The Hudson Genealogy Club meets the Second Friday of the month from 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm at the  Rodgers Memorial Library in Hudson, NH. – http://rodgerslibrary.org/

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AncestryDNA now in 29 additional Countries

This just crossed my newsfeed today (as I am sure it did for many of you.)

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AncestryDNA Now Offered in 29 New Countries

http://blogs.ancestry.com

I find this news very exciting. In our case both Sweeden and Hungary have made the list of available places where the tests can be found.

I have not had a chance to take a test yet but I would like to for both myself and my mother. Susan has and we really have yet to explore the results.

That being said, we know it will take time and our overseas cousins won’t magically appear tomorrow morning but, I better get going on mine too.

If you find an Cousin ‘across the pond’, We would love to hear about it so drop us a line.

Google Maps

I was just exploring custom Google Maps, and because I have all the time in the world… I have created a map to track our ancestors.  I plan to add their residences, business, burial sites and travels.

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To view the progress of the map, keep an eye on our Map Page right here on the web site.

While this is going to be great for tracking exact spots, I am not quite sure how I am going to add information to a generic town – such as ‘Born in Eastham, MA’  My Initial thinking is to just add a marker at the center of town but, this may become a bit messy.  We will see as time goes on.

Do you have any experience with google maps or have made an Ancestry Map of your own?  Leave us a message in the comments or on our Facebook Page with your experiences.