Video

Episode 1 is here!

Episode 1 is finally complete.

This episode features author, blogger and genealogist Deb Sweeney of GenealogyLady.net

We discuss her latest book ‘Dear Mother, Love Daddy’, and then explore a local cemetery in search of a family plot.

Be sure to visit http://discoveringyourpast.wordpress…. for more information about this, and upcoming episodes.

Do you have any stories relating to searching for relatives in cemeteries? Join the discussion on our facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/discoveringyourpast

Links mentioned in this episode:

Genealogy Lady: www.GenealogyLady.net

Nashua’s Edgewood and Woodlawn Cemetery Search Form: [Link]

June 9, 1943 – Merton’s War Diary

June 9, 1943

Mess hall at hospital area open so eating there now. Went spear fishing at foot of glacier, but caught nothing. Many flowers in bloom and mountain goats and artic fox around

Earlier today when researching another entry I actually saw a photograph of the hospital.

Apparently there are two types of Arctic Fox, a White one and a Blue one. According to Greenland.com [Link] “The white arctic fox finds most of its food on the tundra, whilst the blue arctic fox forages along the coast where it finds its food in connection with tidal movements.”

Arctic Fox - Photo by Billy Lindblom

Arctic Fox – Photo by Billy Lindblom

The Photo above was taken by Flickr user Billy Lindblom.  I suggest you head over to his page and check out some more of his great wild life photos. [Link]

“Although Greenland geographically belongs to North America, the majority of plant species originate from Europe. Greenland’s national flower, Niviarsiaq, which means ‘young woman’, is, however, most common in
North America.” – Also from Greenland.com [Link]

Close-up of the flower on Dwarf fireweed (Chamerion latifolium) photographed on a little north-east of the cemetary in Upernavik, Greenland. This flower is the national flower of Greenland and it is called niviarsiak in Greenlandic, which means something like "little girl".  Photo by Kim Hansen

Close-up of the flower on Dwarf fireweed (Chamerion latifolium) photographed on a little north-east of the cemetary in Upernavik, Greenland. This flower is the national flower of Greenland and it is called niviarsiak in Greenlandic, which means something like “little girl”. Photo by Kim Hansen

One final note, the next entry in the diary is not until July 2nd and a few of them become very short and sweet.  I am not sure why there was such a long break but alas there is.  There is another long break between October 1943 and February 1944.

In 1943 and 1944, my Grandfather Merton Young traveled to Greenland while working for the Merritt-Chapman & Scott Company. He wrote a brief diary of his journey and this is a piece of that story.

Next Entry – July 2, 1943

† Dwarf Fireweed – By Kim Hansen (Own work) [GFDLCC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

Filmed the first segment today!

The next big leap has been overcome today as the camera began to roll.  I spent a couple of hours at one of the local cemeteries looking for a family plot.

A screen grab from today's adventure at the cemetery.

A screen grab from today’s adventure at the cemetery.

I shot the piece solo – and hand held so I can only imagine how it is about to turn out.  My inspiration behind this style though is The Geocaching Vlogger.  He travels all around and uses a combination of a hand held ‘selfie’ style and locked down on a tripod.

Much like Geocaching – the search had its moments of confusion and ‘Where am I’, which I don’t know if I was able to catch.  There may have to be a bit of voice over ala Anthony Bourdain to round the whole piece out.

As I know I didn’t get nearly the B-Roll that I was hoping for today, I am going to send an intern out to go capture some of the pick up shots if I don’t go shoot them myself.

I don’t think it will take too long to edit – as long as I can get to the ‘Just Let it Go’ point.

June 6, 1943 – Merton’s War Diary

June 6, 1943

Went to work carrying lumber while waiting for transfer to east coast (#7), getting our meals at the main base where there were movies, commisary, showers, etc.

I know that each of the bases on Greenland at this time are code named starting with Bluie – Meaning Greenland, East or West, and then a number.

A 1747 map of Greenland, including many geographical errors common to the time.

A 1747 map of Greenland, including many geographical errors common to the time.

i.e. Merton is currently at Bluie West One – aka – Narsarsuaq Air Base.  So it made sense to me that the #7 referenced might mean Bluie East 7, simple enough…  But…  There was no East 7.   East only goes to 5.  There is a West 7 however back where Merton first landed in Greenland.

Is this a new base not yet built or one too small to make the history books?  Better yet, is this one too secret to make the history books… or counting back, would it be his seventh location…

Perhaps there will be more clues as we delve further along in the diary.

In 1943 and 1944, my Grandfather Merton Young traveled to Greenland while working for the Merritt-Chapman & Scott Company. He wrote a brief diary of his journey and this is a piece of that story.

Next Entry – June 9

June 5, 1943 – Merton’s War Diary

June 5, 1943

Went ashore, checked in, taken to army rec bldg. Given physical, badges, a hot meal, mail, etc. Taken to hospital area to barracks. No cots, blankets or mattresses until midnight, when it was light enough to read a newspaper. 342 men in six barracks with one cold water faucet outdoors, and one 6 passenger latrine.

Today in that part of Greenland, it looks like the sun sets just before 10:30 pm and rises just after 3:30 am but never gets below the horizon enough to get truly dark.

Camp Pershing in Iceland, 1942

Camp Pershing in Iceland, 1942

We have all head of the midnight sun in which the Sun never sets during the summer months (in the Northern Hemisphere).  This is pretty much limited to North of the Arctic Circle. Bluie West One is about 375 Miles too far South.

What I guess I didn’t know (or remember perhaps is a bit more appropriate,) is that during the winter months these same regions will never see the sun and encounter something called the ‘Polar Night’

In 1943 and 1944,  my Grandfather Merton Young traveled to Greenland while working for the Merritt-Chapman & Scott Company. He wrote a brief diary of his journey and this is a piece of that story.

Next Entry – June 6, 1943